The 100year life living and working in an age of longevity. Andrew Scott on 100 2019-03-21

The 100year life living and working in an age of longevity Rating: 4,1/10 1590 reviews

The 100 Year Life:Working and Living in an Age of Longevity

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

The 100 Year Life provides a primer on the trends unfolding in human longevity - and a clear-eyed look at both the ramifications and the opportunities. They advocate experimenting with new paths as a way to discover what works best for you — and to limit the downside risks. Jim welcomes Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics at the London Business School, and co-author of. Danny Dorling is Halford Mackinder professor of geography, , and author, most recently, of 2016. You have to build your own. Gratton and Scott, professors of management practice and economics, respectively, are both based at the. Which presumably is a euphemism for private school fees.

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The 100 Year Life:Working and Living in an Age of Longevity

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

So, it isn't relating to new demographic trends, which would of course be ridiculously outdated if using 1975 statistics, rather it relates to a debate about what causes increasing life expectancy. That depends upon many factors, including our attitude and how well we plan ahead. Gratton and Scott argue that we need to shift our thinking about retirement to account for this probable gift of time and the multiple stages and transitions that will be involved. One, which is described as the best summary of the current demographic consensus, dates from 1975. The authors predict that assortative mating among the affluent will increase. Were this all true it would be bad news for the cosmetic dentistry, plastic surgery and private education industries.

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Andrew Scott on 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

Most of us have far more pressing concerns. It contains very few references. This books offers a paradigm shift in how to think about retirement — for government policy makers, corporate executives and individuals alike. There will also be tremendous challenges for society and especially government, as greater longevity will put even greater strains on the government to care for those unable to support themselves in extreme old age. The authors note that given the increases in the lifespan, many of us will indeed live longer — and we will either dread the reality of working significantly longer or embrace the gift of additional years and what we can do with them.

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The 100 Year Life:Working and Living in an Age of Longevity

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

Or you could get a life. The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity By Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott Bloomsbury, 280pp, £18. It is these that will define and shape the sequence of events, stages and transitions that together become your accumulated sense of self — your identity. Subscribe If you like what you're reading online, why not take advantage of our subscription and get unlimited access to all of Times Higher Education's content? Just register and complete your career summary. They point out that there are few role models and road maps to reference. Takeaways The new model drastically changes how we need to plan for retirement. The elevator pitch of The 100-Year Life is: stop thinking of others and start thinking of yourself, and carefully choose a future life partner who will also be a business partner who helps you maximise how much you earn over the many years to come.

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Review: The 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

There are many other errors and omissions, including simple mathematical mistakes on rates of return. Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott are professors at the London School of Economics and approach longevity from two different academic perspectives — Management and Economics. There are many risks ahead as well, as the emergence of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence will threaten millions of jobs in the future. The answer lies, in part, with the choices you make and the values you live by. Registration is free and only takes a moment. Gratton and Scott suggest that such beauty is inherited, along with high intelligence and low neuroticism, by which I suspect they mean empathy.

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Review: The 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

It will include several transitions, not just the abrupt transition from working to retiring in the old model. The 100-Year Life is not aimed at a young audience or one much concerned with the society they live in. It is a different debate about whether this too is outdated given advancements in the nature of work, education, medicine, health information and income since 1975, but for you to imply the use of an outdated statistic in this singular context is misleading. The book caveats that there are myriad causes, and the reference gives the 'probably' best explanation 'to the extent that any consensus exists'. The academic value of this book is that it reveals the beliefs of so many of those who govern and employ us. It will encompass multiple phases - instead of one. Presumably they circulate in their own clique, a community of like-minded, well-off London businesspeople.

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Andrew Scott on 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

They discuss how the traditional Three Stage Life education, work, and retirement is ending, and we may soon be looking at a 50-70 year working career. Fortunately, The 100-Year Life is largely a work of fiction. From a non-financial standpoint, people will also need to plan for how they want to optimize the potential gift of additional years in retirement, including lifestyle, health care, work and leisure pursuits. . Clearly people will need to save and invest with the possibility of a longer retirement in mind. The word poverty is mentioned only once in this book. One time they were just like you.

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The 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

Food for Thought Government policies, corporate programs and individual attitudes about retirement are based off an old model of retirement that's obsolete. Over time there are productivity gains and people get promoted and achieve greater responsibility. Professor Scott notes that with every new decade, lifespan is now increasing by 2-3 years, and a child born in 2007 has a 50% chance of living to 104 years old. Because people are now living longer, the authors argue that the models of thinking about retirement need to change. However, this new model of a longer, multi-phased retirement is uncharted territory. .

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Review: The 100

the 100year life living and working in an age of longevity

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