Reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia. Reconstructing identities in higher education : the rise of third space professionals in SearchWorks catalog 2019-01-25

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Shifting Identities and Blurring Boundaries: the Emergence of Third Space Professionals in UK Higher Education

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

However, little attention has been paid to the role that they play in understanding the interface between individuals and institutions at a time of ongoing diversification of the workforce. Thus, at the same time as professional staff are acquiring academic credentials, some academic staff are moving in a more project-oriented direction. Encompassing topics of wide international relevance, the series includes every aspect of the international higher education research agenda, from strategic policy formulation and impact to pragmatic advice on best practice in the field. Unfortunately, publisher restrictions limit this title's availability to school and public library account customers only. It looks at tribal and agro-pastoral groups in Gujarat and Rajasthan such as the Bhils, Meenas and Bishnois in interactions with rural societies and their participation in the processes of state formation; their changing identities and self-perceptions, control of natural resources, environmental changes in the context of forests, agricultural expansion and water resources. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. Being a Third Space Professional 4.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education Research into Higher Education: interrupciones.net: Celia Whitchurch: Libros en idiomas extranjeros

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

Thus, at the same time as professional staff are acquiring academic credentials, some academic staff are moving in a more project-oriented direction. Framed as group auto-ethnography, the paper inquires into the everyday experience of these academics through narrative analysis of multiple first-person accounts and makes apparent the monstrousness of de-affiliated academic identities. About the Series Co-published with the Society for Research into Higher Education This exciting new series aims to publish cutting edge research and discourse that reflects the rapidly changing world of higher education, examined in a global context. Childers, University of Technology, Sydney Table of Contents Part I 1. Thus, at the same time as professional staff are acquiring academic credentials, some academic staff are moving in a more project-oriented direction.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education: The rise of 'Third Space' professionals by Celia Whitchurch

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

However, has there been much change in the junior or middle management roles? Drawing on two international research projects, Reconstructing Relationships in Higher Education: Challenging Agendas looks behind formal organisational structures and workforce patterns to consider the significance of relationships, particularly at local and informal levels, for the aspirations and motivations of academic faculty. Individuals also grapple with the fact that Third Space can, at one and the same time, be a safe haven for experimentation and creativity, and also a risky space in which there is likely to be contestation and uncertainty. Research managers at science-intensive institutions appear as a continuously evolving group of professionals whose identity is somewhat fragmented, even to themselves. In the last decade there has been a shift in the discourses around professional staff in higher education that has been influenced by neoliberal agenda that focused on driving education reforms. Staff who are not members of academe represent about 50% of all staff, and as a group are treated with antipathy by many academics.

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Reconstructing identities in higher education : the rise of third space professionals in SearchWorks catalog

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

At senior levels, professionals are no longer restricted to specialist roles such as human resources or information technology or building services but have moved into the Pro- and Deputy-Vice-Chancellor space, roles previously reserved for senior academics. This has effectively created a Third Space between professional and academic spheres in which lateral interactions, involving teams and networks, occur in parallel with formal institutional structures and processes, and give rise to new forms of management and leadership. Childers, University of Technology, Sydney Autorentext Dr Celia Whitchurch is Senior Lecturer in Higher Education at the University of London Institute of Education. Thus, at the same time as professional staff are acquiring academic credentials, some academic staff are moving in a more project-oriented direction. Based on a narrative analysis of 42 interviews with Finnish academics, nine narratives are discerned, each providing a different answer as to what it means to be an academic in the present-day university. Consideration is therefore given to factors that influence individuals to work in more project-oriented areas, as well as to variables that affect ways in which these roles and identities develop. This study fosters the debate on Grant Management assessment and may contribute to a wider recognition of the profession.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

The text is addressed to professional and academic staff who, by design or default, for long or short periods, find themselves working in Third Space environments; to those to whom such staff may be responsible, including senior management teams; and also to researchers interested in changing identities in higher education. Individuals also grapple with the fact that Third Space can, at one and the same time, be a safe haven for experimentation and creativity, and also a risky space in which there is likely to be contestation and uncertainty. Category: Social Science Author : Marsha L. Dr Celia Whitchurch is Senior Lecturer in Higher Education at the University of London Institute of Education. Third Space Professionals and the Organisational Interface 6. However, the changing nature of work in universities has seen new roles, identities, groups, and relationships emerge, including a new group, third space professionals Whitchurch 2013.

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Shifting Identities and Blurring Boundaries: the Emergence of Third Space Professionals in UK Higher Education

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

Alongside increased functional specialisation to meet, for instance, legislative and market requirements, has been the emergence of more project-oriented individuals who are crossing boundaries to create new forms of practice, working in partnership with academic colleagues in multi-functional teams. In this context, Reconstructing Relationships in Higher Education also reviews ways in which institutions are responding to more agentic approaches by academic faculty, particularly younger cohorts, and the significance of local managers, mentors and academic networks in supporting individuals and promoting career development. This has effectively created a Third Space between professional and academic spheres in which lateral interactions, involving teams and networks, occur in parallel with formal institutional structures and processes, and give rise to new forms of management and leadership. This paper explores the work of professional staff, focusing on the contributions that this group of staff makes to the design, development and maintenance of learning spaces, both physical and virtual. We collected information from two Grant Offices of Portuguese biomedical research institutions from 2008 to 2011 and focused on the European Commission Marie Curie grants. Childers, University of Technology, Sydney. Between these opposites, narratives of work—life balance and bystander follow stable storylines, involving a neutral stance toward university transformations.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education: The rise of 'Third Space' professionals, 1st Edition (Paperback)

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

Thus, at the same time as professional staff are acquiring academic credentials, some academic staff are moving in a more project-oriented direction. Technological changes have created new roles and opportunities with progression opportunities for some staff. It further develops the concept of the blended professional, characterising individuals with identities drawn from both professional and academic domains, and examines the institutional spaces, knowledges, relationships and legitimacies that they construct. Demography and academic staffing: An international perspective. The ability to problematise and accommodate a series of paradoxes and tensions, for instance between formal and more open-ended structures and relationships, would appear to be at the heart of working in Third Space. The outcomes are reported with reference to notions of agential practice in both practice domains as a means of mapping current trends in work practices of educational developers and designers.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education The…

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

The ability to problematise and accommodate a series of paradoxes and tensions, for instance between formal and more open-ended structures and relationships, would appear to be at the heart of working in Third Space. This article sets out to explore how academics make sense of the current transformations of higher education and what kinds of academic identities are thereby constructed. The text is addressed to professional and academic staff who, by design or default, for long or short periods, find themselves working in Third Space environments; to those to whom such staff may be responsible, including senior management teams; and also to researchers interested in changing identities in higher education. This has effectively created a Third Space between professional and academic spheres in which lateral interactions, involving teams and networks, occur in parallel with formal institutional structures and processes, and give rise to new forms of management and leadership. These staff span organizational boundaries and work in blended capacities with academic colleagues. Alongside increased functional specialisation to meet, for instance, legislative and market requirements, has been the emergence of more project-oriented individuals who are crossing boundaries to create new forms of. Third Space Professionals and the Organisational Interface 6.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education: The rise of 'Third Space ...

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

Gordon and Whitchurch 2010;Musselin 2005. Print on Demand title, produced to the highest standard, and there would be a delay in dispatch of around 15 working days. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. Emerging from these interviews is a conceptualisation of the work of professional staff in relation to student outcomes, from the perspective of professional staff themselves. It is suggested that while academic and professional identities have become increasingly dynamic and multi-faceted, change is occurring at different rates in different contexts.

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Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education

reconstructing identities in higher education whitchurch celia

Category: Education Author : Linda A. It is suggested, therefore, that the roles and identities of professional staff are more complex and dynamic than organisation charts or job descriptions might suggest. Universities are large and complex organizations that comprise many groups. It is argued that Australian universities need to invest in the professional development of general staff, in particular for early career general staff, to ensure continued success in the twenty-first century. It is suggested that an increased understanding of this space will enhance the collaborative working of all those involved in research and help maximise research activity. The text is addressed to professional and academic staff who, by design or default, for long or short periods, find themselves working in Third Space environments; to those to whom such staff may be responsible, including senior management teams; and also to researchers interested in changing identities in higher education.

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