Race and the crisis of humanism. Race and the crisis of humanism, New Zealand Geographer 2019-02-11

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Race and the Crisis of Humanism by Kay Anderson (ebook)

race and the crisis of humanism

The question of what it means to be human continues to be deeply relevant. And as, in these terms, the anomalous Aborigine became an anachronism, so Australia's indigenous peoples came to embody the most devastating conclusion of evolutionary thought: that in the human struggle for existence certain races were destined not even to survive. Whereas the difference races of 'man' were previously understood as 'tribal' or 'national' varieties of an essentially unified humanity, by 1850 racial difference was understood to be fundamentally biological, and the different races came to be regarded as permanent types. Despite an explicit return to monogenism, here the Aborigine is invoked to support the claim that race constitutes a more or less permanent difference and, for certain races, a more or less permanent deficiency. Bones, blood and hair of Indigenous people have been collected to shed light on human evolution and mi gration; serology; and, more recently, health disparities.

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Race and the crisis of humanism (Book, 2007) [interrupciones.net]

race and the crisis of humanism

By 1850, racial difference was understood to be fundamentally biological, and the different races came to be regarded as permanent types. As consternation grew not only about their inclination but about their very capacity for improvement, and particularly for cultivation, the Aborigines challenged the basis upon which the unity of humankind had been assumed. Race and the crisis of humanism Race and the crisis of humanism Gombay, Nicole 2008-12-01 00:00:00 Race and the crisis of humanism Kay Anderson. The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. She has recently been presented with the 2007 Honours Award for contributions to scholarship on race and ethnicity by the Ethnic Geography Speciality Group of the Associatin of American Geographers.

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Race and the crisis of humanism (Book, 2007) [interrupciones.net]

race and the crisis of humanism

In Kay Anderson's provocative new account, she argues that British colonial encounters in Australia from the late 1700s with the apparently unimproved condition of the Australian Aborigine, viewed against an understanding of 'humanity' of the time that is, as characterised by separation from nature , precipitated a crisis in existing ideas of what it meant to be human. This lucid, intelligent and persuasive argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology, and Australian and environmental studies. The intractable Aborigine came to supply seemingly irrefutable evidence for an essential, permanent and innate racial difference; and so came to provide the strongest support for those who maintained the intrinsic inferiority of the 'dark-skinned' races more generally. This lucid, intelligent and persuasive argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology, and Australian and environmental studies. She is the author of Vancouver's Chinatown: Racial Discourse in Canada 1875-1980 and co-editor and contributor of the Handbook of Cultural Geography. The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. They also show how empire became a contentious focus of attention at certain moments and in particular ways.

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Race and the Crisis of Humanism eBook: Kay Anderson: interrupciones.net: Kindle Store

race and the crisis of humanism

The elaboration of polygenism may therefore be understood as arising out of this humanist incomprehension: as an attempt to account for the ontologically inexplicable difference of the Australian Aborigine. The idea of race underwent a radical shift in the mid-19th Century. The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking, when the 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. Against the background of what was considered to be a distinctly human capacity to rise above nature, our central argument however is that the extreme and irremediable savagery attributed to the Aborigine led to the mid-nineteenth shift to a polygenist, or an innatist, idea of race. In contrast to existing terms such as elective race, ethnic fraud and transracialism, race discordance does not seek to explain or judge the validity of identity claims that do not match perceived appearance. Dealing with the question of what caused this shift, this book is useful for students interested in history and theories of 'race'.

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Kay Anderson: Race and the Crisis of Humanism (ePUB)

race and the crisis of humanism

The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. The 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. She is a leading scholar in the field of cultural geography and is internationally recognised for her contributions to the development of the 'cultural turn' in Geography. In Kay Anderson's provocative new account, she argues that British colonial encounters in Australia from the late 1700s with the apparently unimproved condition of the Australian Aborigine, viewed against an understanding of 'humanity' of the time that is, as characterised by separation from nature , precipitated a crisis in existing ideas of what it meant to be human. The question of what it means to be human continues to be deeply relevant. The E-mail message field is required.

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Race and the Crisis of Humanism: 1st Edition (Hardback)

race and the crisis of humanism

I supposed that, excepting the odd philosopher and religious adherent, preoccupations with what it is to be human — of who we are and where we come from — was not hugely significant today. The 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. The 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. They assess how people thought imperially, not in the sense of political affiliations for or against empire, but simply assuming it was there, part of the given world that had made them who they were. This lucid, intelligent and persuasive argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology, and Australian and environmental studies. The 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. This argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology and Australian and environmental studies.

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Kay Anderson: Race and the Crisis of Humanism (ePUB)

race and the crisis of humanism

She traces Journal New Zealand Geographer — Wiley Published: Dec 1, 2008. This lucid, intelligent and persuasive argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology, and Australian and environmental studies. In Kay Anderson's provocative new account, she argues that British colonial encounters in Australia from the late 1700s with the apparently unimproved condition of the Australian Aborigine, viewed against an understanding of 'humanity' of the time that is, as characterised by separation from nature , precipitated a crisis in existing ideas of what it meant to be human. Kay Anderson is Professor of Cultural Research at the Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney. She was joint editor of the flagship Progress in Human Geography 2000--2004 , and is an editorial board member of journals including Urban Geography, Cultural Geographies, Australian Geographical Studies, and Ethics, Place and Environment.

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Race and the Crisis of Humanism eBook: Kay Anderson: interrupciones.net: Kindle Store

race and the crisis of humanism

I supposed that, excepting the odd philosopher and religious adherent, preoccupations with what it is to be human — of who we are and where we come from — was not hugely significant today. The Human: Savagery and Nature 3. Rethinking 'Race' from Australia 5. In Kay Anderson's provocative new account, she argues that Br The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. Conclusion About the Author Kay Anderson is Professor of Cultural Research at the Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney. She has recently been presented with the 2007 Honours Award for contributions to scholarship on race and ethnicity by the Ethnic Geography Speciality Group of the Associatin of American Geographers.

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Race and the Crisis of Humanism: 1st Edition (Hardback)

race and the crisis of humanism

She is the author of Vancouver's Children: Racial Discourse in China 1875-1980 and co-editor and contributor of the Handbook of Cultural Geography. Routledge , London , 2007. We distinguish three phases of this development. But upon reflection, Anderson is undoubtedly tackling a question whose contemporary import is far from negligible. Drawing on the tools of anthropology, history, and science and technology studies, this research aims to re-evaluate the role of biology in Aboriginal studies.

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