Pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence. Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici : the transformation of the Renaissance portrait in Florence / Carl Brandon Strehlke ; with essays by Elizabeth Cropper ... [et al.]. 2019-01-25

Pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence Rating: 8,1/10 1718 reviews

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici: The Transformation of the Renaissance Portrait in Florence (Cloth)

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

He depicts himself almost full length reflected in a mirror. Pages and cover are clean and intact. An essay by Mark S. It was a winning game. He was prepared to spend a mint on creating a dynastic advertising campaign through art, and specifically through portraiture. The book will accompany an exhibition to be held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from November 20, 2004, to February 13, 2005. I81 A1 S86 2004 Book; Illustrated English Open to the public Held.

Next

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici: the transformation of the Renaissance ...

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

A glossary, a genealogy of the Medici family, and a bibliography complete this publication. Mention the word and he fell apart. In his catalogue entries, Carl Brandon Strehlke surveys the history and multifaceted significance of the Medici portraits and other paintings, drawings, coins, medals, books, and prints in the exhibition, offering a wealth of insights into these works and the Florentine men and women they portray. His face and the child's are a lot alike. He lived alone in a room reached by a ladder that he could pull up after him. In his masterful painting of Alessandro of 1534-35, Pontormo depicts the duke in the unusual task of making a metalpoint drawing, demonstrating not only the importance of drawing as a cultivated activity for privileged Florentines, but also the status it was given in the hierarchy of the arts.

Next

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici: The Transformation

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

The system has a depth resolution from 1 to 2 to 5 to 10 µm, depending on the painting technique, and the information obtained permits discovery of the stratigraphical composition. Detailed observation indicates that there is a close correspondence between the Halberdier's hand deformity and that of Cosimo I in the comparison portraits. Tucker, Irma Passeri, Ken Sutherland, and Beth A. Finally, Ca appeared in the ground layer. The results showed that, when a vial was only partially painted with the white paints keeping a window free of paint to allow photons to exit , the efficiency and spectral distribution of the painted vial was similar to that of a non-painted vial.

Next

Philadelphia Museum of Art

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

Then, from just a few years later, comes a self-image utterly unlike the first. The most varied versions of this beautiful prayer. He'd like to meet you; he'd like to meet anyone who might advance his churchly ambitions or share his taste for erotic poetry. This book takes the former approach and it is indeed a valuable book for art historians and reference book for art history students and those particularly fond of the 1600s Italy. In many ways it is a study of the perfect classicism of the Renaissance painters as that technique of perfection fell into the hands of the Mannerists - Mannerism was the art movement that took place immediately after the Renaissance during the 16th century that provided the bridge to the Baroque era of painting. Pathological anomalies of the finger joints in the left hand of the Halberdier are compared with those in three acknowledged portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici. Strehlke’s long-awaited catalogue of Italian painting from the late medieval and early Renaissance period in the Museum.

Next

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici: The Transformation of the Renaissance Portrait in Florence By Carl Strehlke and Elizabeth Cropper

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

While there are well reproduced images of the paintings being discussed, some of which are in the exhibition, and many photographs in black and white of important details of discussion, the overall impression of this book is one of scholarly completeness. “When Amilcare Pizzi, the renowned publisher in Milan of the Great Italian Drawings series invited us to offer a selection from our collection for publication we were deeply honored. The older artist was around 40 when the drawing was done. Finally there's that mystery man near the door, looking up as he absently sketches a woman's face on a scrap of paper. A tour driver for Mike Heron lived in Philadelphia and in the middle of moving picked me up at rush hour at the the round about below the museum with his friend in a big Uhaul and we drove all over the city - a tour only a local could give.

Next

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici: The Transformation of the Renaissance Portrait in Florence: Carl Strehlke, Elizabeth Cropper: 9780271025360: interrupciones.net: Books

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

Above all, her composure is wittily played against the quizzical tilt of its cocked head and uplifted paw. Information subject to change without notice. A reflective coating based on white paint, black paint and varnish has been evaluated to determine its reflective capabilities and its potential use in radioactivity detectors based on organic scintillators. Wisely the curators and the essayists focus on the Florentine family - the Medicis - and it is in this restriction of period study that the book and exhibition both excel and detract. Focusing on the two great 16th-century Medici portraits in the Museum which are joined by major loans from the Uffizi Gallery in Florence and other exceptional collections, this jewel of an exhibition traces the role of portraiture and the elevation of drawing in Renaissance Florence. He stands in three-quarters profile, stripped to his underpants, a quizzical look on his face, and one hand, index finger extended, pointing straight out at the viewer, or, rather, at his reflected self.

Next

Philadelphia Museum of Art

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

These three portraits show the hands of Cosimo in approximately the same position as the Halberdier's hand, thus allowing a meaningful comparison. Tucker and colleagues discusses findings from the recent conservation of Pontormo's portrait of Alessandro. The catalogue is provided with a useful glossary and index. The identity of the young man in Jacopo Pontormo's Portrait of a Halberdier has long been disputed by art historians. In his catalogue entries, Carl Brandon Strehlke surveys the history and multifaceted significance of the Medici portraits and other paintings, drawings, coins, medals, books, and prints in the exhibition, offering a wealth of insights into the Medici dukes and the artists who served them.

Next

Pontormo, Bronzino, and the Medici : the transformation of the Renaissance portrait in Florence

pontormo bronzino and the medici the transformation of the renaissance portrait in florence

The two Philadelphia portraits offer fascinating private views of important rulers of Renaissance Florence. This relationship fueled the paragone debate on the merits of sculpture versus painting. The panel is compositionally linked to the Study for a Portrait of a Youth cat. In his painting of Alessandro, Pontormo depicts the duke in the act of making a drawing, an activity prized both as part of the humanist culture of aristocratic Italians and as the basis of the art of the Florentine masters. Often they take one of two directions: either they concentrate on the scholarly aspects of the research that went into the production of the exhibition, or they approach the viewer of the exhibition with a solidly constructed reference for understanding and appreciating the art of that particular museum venture. Today's News November 27, 2004 Most Popular Last Seven Days 1.

Next