Building bridges mcadoo monty l dr. Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library 2019-03-03

Building bridges mcadoo monty l dr Rating: 5,1/10 1024 reviews

Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

If the student were to lose points on the assignment because of the use of this source, the student is likely to be reluctant to contact that librarian in the future. Findings — Donors, internal and external to the library and to the university, have shown an interest in funding projects that reduce textbook costs for students. This need seems self-evident, with benefits for all involved; yet establishing strong collaborations between librarians and instructors isn't always as straightforward as it might seem. Others still may be completely unaware of what assistance the library has to offer. When working with students, librarians serve as bridges as well. Many librarians often have difficulty accepting the role that their distance from the assignment may have played in these failures. Rossman will address such issues as legal and board policy considerations, contracts and procedures, promotion and marketing, partnerships, and other common challenges in the fundraising process.

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Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library by Monty L. McAdoo

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

He has over twenty years of experience as a professional librarian and currently serves as research and instruction librarian at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. But if you're a newbie, how do you know where to begin, let alone where to go from there? The cause and the consequences of an unsuccessful assignment are typically associated with either the instructor who created the assignment, the students to whom it was assigned, or some combination thereof. Practical implications — Libraries have traditionally supported the mission of access to information and for academic libraries that has sometimes included access to textbooks. We have to know how to perform circulation tasks, reference duties, run a storytime program, clean up a massive spill, and even understand some technical service components. This is exacerbated by instructors who may resist sharing or even discussing elements of their courses with those outside their discipline. He has over twenty years of experience as a professional librarian and currently serves as research and instruction librarian at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania.

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Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

Limitations on classroom time, for example, often make it difficult to include library instruction. As educators prepare students for today's information-rich world, it is imperative for librarians to work more closely with instructors to develop, administer, and evaluate assignments. It will help you help students learn the difference between fact-finding and research, and why research is important. It is well thought-out both in its presentation and content. For example, even if an instructor wants to alter an assignment, the curriculum process may prohibit an individual from doing so. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian Mc Adoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language.

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Building Bridges: Workshop Service Repair Manual

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

Structured in a way that's easy to digest, McAdoo shows students what research is and what it entails, the stages of research, and the elements of a term paper; the essential steps in preparing for research, and how to understand the assignment;how libraries and librarians can help; pointers for selecting a research topic and appropriate information tools; strategies for conducting searches that will save time and effort, from using keywords to constructing more sophisticated searches; how to understand, read, and evaluate search results; the dos and don'ts of conducting research ethically, including how to cite sources and how and why to avoid plagiarism; and guidance for shaping research results into quality writing. Unfortunately, these collaborations do not always occur, and assignments involving the library fail. McAdoo has a bachelor's degree in psychology, an M. And yet, as bridge builders, the simple reality is that when a library is involved in completing an assignment, librarians do share responsibility for an assignment's administration and its ultimate success or collapse. Abdicating responsibility is not the proper response. In turn, this may create an unintentional wall with the instructor, who may believe the librarian is incompetent for misinterpreting what was intended. Librarians have a professional responsibility to be involved with any assignment involving the library.

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Monty L. McAdoo: Fundamentals of Library Instruction (PDF)

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

McAdoo, provides step-by-step guidance, from understanding the stages of the research cycle to determining the kind of research to conduct. For example, when students are told they cannot use encyclopedias, does this mean only general encyclopedias or subject-specific ones as well? Monty McAdoo has a bachelor's degree in psychology, an M. Lastly, there may be institutional impediments in place blocking effective collaboration. The wealth of McAdoo's real-world suggestions included throughout this guide are priceless, and this reviewer, an experienced academic librarian, plans to try out some of them soon. Making these sorts of decisions is all part of an academic or school librarian's daily routine; but it is not uncommon for public librarians to have to make similar judgments while working with students completing homework assignments. When we are involved in working with students completing assignments, we must be prepared to accept some level of responsibility for the consequences—good or bad. The sheer amount of information available can be intimidating to even the most skilled researchers.

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Research Skills Poster

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

Because librarians experience challenges like these on a firsthand basis, one of the most visible bridge-building roles a librarian can play is sharing these experiences and working with the instructor to create more effective assignments. He is also interested in the philosophy of library and information science. But even with a well-designed assignment, addressing the student's expressed needs while interpreting the instructor's expectations is often a difficult balancing act. In addition to providing traditional library user education, he has developed and teaches an undergraduate class on information ethics and has also taught graduate-level courses in both counseling and research. Jumping head first into a research project is a surefire recipe for stress and confusion. There are both qualitative and quantitative methods to induce donors to fund these types of projects.

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Monty L. McAdoo: Fundamentals of Library Instruction (PDF)

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

His research interests include faculty understanding and use of information literacy and information technology. Packed with useful tips and techniques, this handy guide offers advice on working with both students and instructors to develop successful assignments that integrate your library's resources. Conversely, many librarians believe they have a monopoly on information or on teaching students to work with it. Professional demands on time are common. Four of the more common challenges to effective collaborations are: personality, practical, perceptual, and institutional.

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Building Bridges: Connecting Faculty, Students, and the College Library by Monty L. McAdoo

building bridges mcadoo monty l dr

The webinar will take place on March 15. Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. Arguably, though, the most troubling consequences are the intangible ones such as the librarian being perceived as unhelpful or even incompetent. For example, the role of librarians in the educational process is often misunderstood or overlooked by instructors. While this is clearly not true, it is also something some librarians are loathe to admit. Librarians have similar difficulties understanding the collateral damage that failed assignments can have on the library and library staff. And the bridge metaphor is fitting because creating a bridge is exactly what academic librarians must do in order to connect with faculty members and students to provide more visibility for library resources and services and to instill recognition of their usefulness.

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